Archive for October, 2009

Cobb Peak Ice

October 15, 2009

SMG guide Drew Daly and I got out yesterday to check out the ice on the lower flanks of Cobb Peak.  The climbing is located at 10,000 feet and we approached through as much as 2.5 feet of snow!  Skiers–none of this snow has faceted and at least for now it looks like a great base!  The ice conditions were thin and wet, but hey, it’s only October! 

There are fixed anchors (3/8′ bolts with Metolius Rap Hangers) at the top and the climbs can be TR’d with a 60m rope.  There is also a set of anchors about 100 feet lookers right of the main flow for a mixed line that isn’t currently in condition.

Approaching the Cobb Ice.

Approaching the Cobb Ice.


Drew's Alpine Bender Continues!

Drew's Alpine Bender Continues!

Summer Photos

October 8, 2009
Baron Spire and Baron Lakes.

Baron Spire and Baron Lakes.

Community School Juniors on top of the Super Slabs.

Community School Juniors on top of the Super Slabs.

Ellen Singer underneath the Grand Aguille.

Ellen Singer underneath the Grand Aguille.

Warbonnet Basecamp at the Feather Lakes.

Warbonnet Basecamp at the Feather Lakes.

Looking down the Stur Chimney on Mt. Heyburn.  Camp 4's Rule!

Looking down the Stur Chimney on Mt. Heyburn. Camp 4's Rule!

Sarah Michael and Virginia Eggers on the summit of Mt. Heyburn.

Sarah Michael and Virginia Eggers on the summit of Mt. Heyburn.

Mountain goat near the summit of the Devil's Bedstead.

Mountain goat near the summit of the Devil's Bedstead.

Is this man afraid of heights?

Is this man afraid of heights?

North Face of Mt. Borah

October 8, 2009

On Monday Sept. 21 Frank Gould and I climbed the North Face of Mt. Borah.  Although the face looked pretty melted out, it was acutally in great shape with firm snow down low and hard alpine ice up high.   The traverse to the standard finish in the couloir that tops out near the summit was completely melted out.   Instead we opted for the couloir that tops out on  the Northwest ridge, about 200 vertical from the summit.  From the notch at the top of the couloir it’s easy 3rd class to the summit.  We climbed together on firm snow with crampons to the base of the ice.  Then we climbed the ice in 4 pitches to near the top of the couloir.  The ice dead-ended about 100 feet from top-out on the Northwest Ridge, but the climbing was easy 3rd class, albeit loose and ugly!

 

Most excellent bivy at 10,000 feet with great limestone bouldering!

Most excellent bivy at 10,000 feet with great limestone bouldering!

Frank on the 2nd ice pitch.

Frank on the 2nd ice pitch.

Our Route in red.  This photo shows how the upper horizontal snowfield doesn't link to the summit couloir.

Our Route in red. This photo shows how the upper horizontal snowfield doesn't link to the summit couloir.

Northeast Ridge of the Devil’s Bedstead West

October 8, 2009

On August 7th Robb Hamblen and I climbed the Northeast Ridge of the Devil’s Bedstead West in the Pioneer Range.  The route entailed about 1600 feet of 3rd, 4th, and easy 5th class climbing on generally sound rock.  During the last 300 feet the rock quality deteriorated somewhat.  We descended the trail down the Right Fork of Kane Creek, which made for an excellent loop.  Our climb may have been a first ascent, but in a canyon as popular as Kane Creek this would seem unlikely!  I’m continually amazed by the stellar character of the Pioneer Range and the enormous potential for alpine climbing!

Bedstead West

End July 2009 057

 

End July 2009 065